Summer volunteers bond while learning about Gullah culture

When you make a difference in the life of one, it creates a ripple effect. As we continue to put our creative minds to work and discuss the need for land preservation on St. Helena Island, seven students from USC and Columbia College collaborate with us each week and assist with creating a change.

180514_001_dam

The Gullah Project’s summer volunteers are, from left, Rose Steptoe, Jai-Anna Carter, Xavier Parker, Demetri Kotsinis; seated, Melvonia Taylor, Brianna Morales; and not pictured, Steven Tapia-Macias. photo by Denise McGill

These students make up The Gullah Project’s summer volunteer team. They do a wide range of tasks that are essential behind the scenes of the film. As they transcribe footage, create posts for social media, assist our director, write blog posts, and do production research, our volunteers gain valuable, first-hand experience to help them in their careers and learn more about the importance of the project.

They also acquire knowledge from the film’s director Denise McGill and producer Sherard Duvall, when they attend Film School on Tuesdays. Here they learn more about visual communication, public relations, media arts, and Gullah/Geechee culture. We sat down with the interns and asked them a few questions about the internship.

Why were you interested in becoming a volunteer for The Gullah Project?

  • Jai: I am interested in the art of film and how it impacts the viewer.
  • Brianna: I love documentaries and appreciate the work put into creating them. I was also interested in learning more about Gullah culture.
  • Steven: I am interested in The Gullah Project because I believe documentaries have the power to educate the public and be a catalyst for meaningful change and participation. I am looking forward to learning technical aspects of production as well as post-production. Getting to learn more about the Gullah people is also a major reason for joining the project.
  • Demetri: I wanted to learn more about the Gullah culture as well as the process of making a documentary.

As a volunteer, what are your responsibilities?

  • Brianna: I am responsible for viewing and logging footage.
  • Jai: I am responsible for assisting with social media platforms, gathering visuals, and writing blog posts. I also monitor Gullah/Geechee upcoming events and happenings.
  • Steven: My responsibilities are to log and tag footage in order to make the editing process easier.
  • Xavier: My responsibilities are to be an assistant to the director and producer and log clips.
  • Rose: My responsibilities are to help with production research and logging footage.
  • Mel: I’m responsible for logging footage, writing blog posts, creating character keys, and assisting Jai with social media.
  • Demetri: My responsibilities are logging, tagging, and editing footage.

What have you valued most from this experience so far?

  • Rose: So far, being on a team with multiple backgrounds, goals, and responsibilities has been valuable and insightful to me. I usually don’t have the chance to interact with other majors in a setting like this during the semester. It’s helped me see how important interdisciplinary work and working with a team can be.
  • Xavier: I’ve valued learning from others and being around like-minded individuals who want to work in or are working in media-related fields. Creative people feed off of one another, and that’s how we grow.
  • Mel: I have valued the opportunity to learn from a photojournalist, since I would like to be one in the near future. Also, I’ve enjoyed attending Film School each Tuesday and hearing what each of the interns and volunteers have learned from the footage they’ve logged or transcribed. Knowing the film may impact many lives, including mine, is empowering because, as a person who’s interested in social justice journalism, I feel the message behind the film, preserving land in St. Helena Island, is a relevant topic and the film could create conversations that can lead to change.